Talk:Carl Griffith's sourdough starter

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Did you know nomination[edit]

The following is an archived discussion of the DYK nomination of the article below. Please do not modify this page. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page (such as this nomination's talk page, the article's talk page or Wikipedia talk:Did you know), unless there is consensus to re-open the discussion at this page. No further edits should be made to this page.

The result was: promoted by Theleekycauldron (talk) 08:00, 20 November 2021 (UTC)

A loaf of bread baked with Carl Griffith's sourdough starter
A loaf of bread baked with Carl Griffith's sourdough starter
  • ... that Carl Griffith's sourdough starter has been continually grown since 1847, and has been shared with over 54,000 people? Source: Quotes from article: "According to Carl T. Griffith, his family's sourdough culture was originally created by his great-grandmother, who traveled with her sourdough west from Missouri along the Oregon Trail in 1847, settling near Salem, Oregon." (Lynn Harris, "Sourdough Culture", in Gastronomica, 2003. Kate Masters, "How did an internet-famous sourdough starter travel from Oregon to Jefferson?", The Frederick News-Post, 2019.) "Carls' Friends have distributed more than 54,000 samples of Griffith's sourdough starter." (Chey Scott, "Homemade sourdough bread is seeing a quarantine-spurred resurgence; two local experts share their best bread-baking advice", Inlander, 2020.)
    • ALT1: ... that Carl Griffith's sourdough starter has been continually grown since 1847, and is now freely shared by a dedicated historical preservation society? Source: Quotes from article: "According to Carl T. Griffith, his family's sourdough culture was originally created by his great-grandmother, who traveled with her sourdough west from Missouri along the Oregon Trail in 1847, settling near Salem, Oregon." (Lynn Harris, "Sourdough Culture", in Gastronomica, 2003. Kate Masters, "How did an internet-famous sourdough starter travel from Oregon to Jefferson?", The Frederick News-Post, 2019.) "Ten friends and devotees formed the 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Starter Preservation Society, also known as Carl's Friends, to continue his legacy by maintaining the starter and freely sharing samples." (Lynn Harris)
    • ALT2: ... that Carl Griffith's sourdough starter has been continually used to make bread since 1847? Source: Quotes from article: "According to Carl T. Griffith, his family's sourdough culture was originally created by his great-grandmother, who traveled with her sourdough west from Missouri along the Oregon Trail in 1847, settling near Salem, Oregon." (Lynn Harris, "Sourdough Culture", in Gastronomica, 2003. Kate Masters, "How did an internet-famous sourdough starter travel from Oregon to Jefferson?", The Frederick News-Post, 2019.)
    • ALT3: ... that a sourdough starter that traveled the Oregon Trail in 1847 was passed down to Carl Griffith, who shared it on Usenet? Source: The Frederick News-Post
    • ALT4: ... that for the price of postage, any asker can receive a sample of starter from the 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Starter Preservation Society, also known as Carl's Friends? Source: The Frederick News-Post or Lynn Harris, in Gastronomica: "If you sent Griffith a self-addressed stamped envelope, he would send you a portion of this sourdough starter, the origins of which predate the Pony Express. In 2000, when Griffith died at the age of eighty, ten of his friends and devotees founded The 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Starter Preservation Society, otherwise known as Carl’s Friends. This group now works together to maintain the starter and to respond to requests for samples." (quote from Harris)
    • ALT5: ... that the keepers of Carl Griffith's sourdough starter, which traveled the Oregon Trail in 1847, are sworn to keep no other sourdough starter in their homes? Source: C&EN News, The Frederick News-Post
    • ALT6: ... that you can send a self-addressed stamped envelope to the 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Starter Preservation Society, also known as Carl's Friends, to receive a packet of starter? Source: The Frederick News-Post or Lynn Harris, in Gastronomica: "If you sent Griffith a self-addressed stamped envelope, he would send you a portion of this sourdough starter, the origins of which predate the Pony Express. In 2000, when Griffith died at the age of eighty, ten of his friends and devotees founded The 1847 Oregon Trail Sourdough Starter Preservation Society, otherwise known as Carl’s Friends. This group now works together to maintain the starter and to respond to requests for samples." (quote from Harris)

Moved to mainspace by Anon423 (talk). Self-nominated at 03:54, 5 November 2021 (UTC).

  • @Anon423: Hi, I'll review this! The article is new, long enough, all three photos made by Anon, and so are free to use, sources are ok. Not much copyvio, so this is also ok. Hooks are interesting, I'd personally prefer ALT3 or ALT5, though all hooks are good. I see no problems here, it's ready. Symbol confirmed.svg Artem.G (talk) 07:47, 17 November 2021 (UTC)

ALT5 to T:DYK/P1