Wikipedia:Today's featured article/October 22, 2021

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Male in land phase
Male in land phase

The smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) is widespread in Europe and parts of Asia and is an introduced species in Australia. It is brown with a dark-spotted orange to white underside, with males larger than females. The skin is dry and velvety while the newts live on land but becomes smooth after they migrate into water, when males become more vivid and grow a crest on their back. Smooth newts live nocturnally on land for most of the year, and are found in a wide range of habitats. They feed on invertebrates, and are eaten by fish, birds and snakes. They breed in ponds, where males court females with an underwater display. Females lay eggs on water plants, and larvae hatch after 10 to 20 days. The young metamorphose into terrestrial juveniles in around three months. Maturity is reached after 2 to 3 years, and adults live up to 14 years. This newt is classed as a least-concern species, but has suffered from habitat destruction and introduced fish. It is listed in the Berne Convention as a protected species. (Full article...)